Pluto in Capricorn; Jupiter in Virgo: Food and Abundance

 photo: Olenka Kotyk; Unsplash

photo: Olenka Kotyk; Unsplash

A while back on Twitter, I tweeted about how important it is not to skip meals and how missing meals is actually a form of blocking abundance. As someone born with Venus (love, pleasure, money) in the Fourth House (family, nurturing, food, home) of my birth chart (a personal blueprint or cosmic map), food is a source of wealth to me. Keep in mind that I fully understand that for those who can't afford to eat regularly or suffer from an eating disorder, eating on a healthy and consistent basis is of course out of their control and requires help. However, for those of us who are able to keep up with our meals, we shouldn't take for granted that creating space to eat (as well as the food itself) is a form of physical capital.

As Pluto, the planet associated with power and deep transformation, continues to move through stable and business-oriented Capricorn (which incidentally is also moving through my zone of income and possessions), we are encouraged to review and redefine our wealth. While food and nourishment may seem to fall in Cancer's wheelhouse (Cancer is the sign in charge of the astrological Fourth House), Capricorn has some authority in this realm too as Capricorn shares Cancer's need for security. The only difference being that Cancer, a water sign, craves emotional security while Capricorn seeks it in the material world. And if we can consider land and crops as physical resources (both provide a source of sustenance and security), then our bodies have to be included too. After all, we can't do much if we don't have our health.

Food as wealth (and health) is also symbolized by another planetary transit—Jupiter in Virgo. Jupiter, the planet that represents abundance and good fortune, is currently moving through the sign of Virgo, where it will stay until September 9th. Virgo, an earth sign, is concerned with physical well-being, efficiency, healthy routines, and duty.  In Greek myth, from where astrological symbolism is derived, Virgo is connected to the Virgin archetype. The Virgin represents feminine and fertile energy symbolized by earth, tilling the land, growing crops that feed and sustain, and harvesting the bounty of those crops when the work is done. This is also why in medical astrology Virgo is in charge of the digestive system, because here is where the body gets what it needs in order to function and thrive. Through Jupiter in Virgo, we’re learning the importance being more disciplined with our bodies and resources. In this case; how we eat, what we eat, and when we eat it makes all the world of difference as to whether we’re feeling like we’re thriving or not.

It’s this relationship between discipline and eating, or rather work and eating (after all we need to work in order to eat) that got me to thinking about how little we create space to eat (because of work), and how that contributes to lack and depletion. As the landscape of the American workforce continues to shift (thank you, Pluto), bringing with this shift a rise in freelancing, telecommuting, and entrepreneurship; the normal 9-5 job schedule that we’ve become accustomed to is on a steady decline.1 However, with the shadow side of Pluto being connected to the misuse of power—specifically by those already in power, in this case Capricorn seems to also represent big business and its penchant for creating an office culture that leaves employees little work-life balance. How does this tie into food? I asked my followers on Twitter how many of them made a habit of skipping or working through their lunch break because of work. Unsurprisingly, I received a huge response from people, mostly women, who I did this. As a result, they also told me how poorly it affected them (i.e. moodiness, headache, fatigue, etc.) And here’s why I explained to my Twitter followers that eating and eating well is important; if we want to magnetize abundance, we have to be in a place where we already feel abundant, both emotionally and physically, in order to attract more of it to us. Otherwise, we'll find ourselves operating from a place of desperation and lack. And as anyone can tell you, desperation is not sexy.

 

 

 

1.       Pudwell, Sam. “The rise of telecommuting: 45 percent of US employees work from home.”BetaNews. September 11, 2015. Accessed March 29, 2016. http://betanews.com/2015/09/11/the-rise-of-telecommuting-45-percent-of-us-employees-work-from-home/